The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees called off the strike after reaching a tentative deal on new three-year contracts with Hollywood producers.

Shutdowns from the Covid-19 pandemic had caused a production backlog that led to crews working up to 14 hours a day to feed programming to streaming services.

Shutdowns from the Covid-19 pandemic had caused a production backlog that led to crews working up to 14 hours a day to feed programming to streaming services.
(AP)

An 11th-hour deal averted a strike of film and television crews that would have seen some 60,000 behind-the-scenes workers walk off their jobs and would have frozen productions in Hollywood and across the US.

The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE), which includes camera operators, make-up artists, sound technicians and others, said on Saturday negotiators agreed to a new three-year contract.

“This is a Hollywood ending,” union president Matthew Loeb said. “Our members stood firm.”

The workers still must vote to approve it, but the strike has been called off with the tentative deal.

Many in Hollywood celebrated the news.

“Good for @IATSE for standing your ground. And don’t forget we got your back anytime you need us,” comedian, actor and writer Patton Oswalt said on Twitter.

Hard work, less money

Another actor, comic and writer, Yvette Nicole Brown, tweeted ”#UnionStrong!” along with a link to a story reporting the agreement.

“Congratulations IATSE brothers and sisters!” Jennifer Garner said on Instagram.

The effects of the strike would have been immediate, with crews not only on long-term productions but daily series including network talk shows walking off their jobs.

Shows with short turnarounds like soap operas would also have felt immediate effects.

Union members said previous contracts allowed their employers to force them to work excessive hours and deny them reasonable rest via meal breaks and sufficient time off between shifts.

Leaders said the lowest paid crafts were receiving unliveable wages and streaming outlets including Netflix, Apple and Amazon were allowed to work them even harder for less money.

READ MORE: Our crews deserve better’: Hollywood union votes for strike

Source: TRTWorld and agencies





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