No Time To Die

The hype is through the roof for No Time to Die. Not only is it the first James Bond movie in six years and one that’s been delayed by about 18 months, but it also marks the very last time Daniel Craig will play 007. The Knives Out actor first appeared the legendary super-spy in 2006’s Casino Royale, meaning he’s the longest-running performer to play the part in the franchise’s 60-year history.

So it’s no surprise that Craig teared up upon making his farewell speech when No Time To Die wrapped production back in 2019. This emotional moment was shared in the documentary special Being James Bond, which is available to watch on Apple TV now. Filmthusiast also shared the clip on social media. Watch Craig’s speech via the tweet below:

In the clip, Craig speaks to the gathered crew while holding back tears as he remarks that many of the people who worked on NTTD also worked on the previous four Bond films he’s starred in.

“I know there’s a lot of things said about what I think about these films or all of those… whatever,” Craig said, “but I’ve loved every single second of these movies, and especially this one, because I’ve got up every morning and I’ve had the chance to work with you guys. And that’s been one of the greatest honors of my life.”

The star appears to be alluding to those old rumors that he was made to do a fifth film against his will, or at least only did it for the paycheck, but it’s clear from this video that saying goodbye to Bond and the friends and colleagues he made on these productions was a hugely emotional experience for Craig. And it’s hugely emotional for fans to see him leave the franchise behind, too, as he’s been the only Bond a whole generation has known.

Also featuring Rami Malek, Lea Seydoux, Lashana Lynch, Ana de Armas, and Christoph Waltz, No Time To Die finally hits theaters on October 6th in the US, following its debut in UK cinemas on September 30th. Pretty soon we should get the first reactions to the movie and we’ll find out whether it’s been worth the long, long wait.





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